acne: nature's depraved fountain of youth


If you're a fan of Seinfeld, then you may recall the infamous Yada Yada episode where Kramer calls Mother Nature a mad scientist in his usual, exaggerated fashion.  I recently learned that there is a lot of truth to that phrase, specifically in reference to acne.

For as long as I can remember, I've been a chronic sufferer of acne.  A victim of pimples, plagued with every variety there is, from adolescence, to adulthood, to the hormonal cycle, I've basically seen it all and my skin has felt it all.

The slightest whisper of the wrong lotion, soap, beauty product, garment, fabric softer, detergent, or food, and my skin rings an alarm of epic proportions.  "Is it too hot?  Here let me show you how hot it is with a pimple gift," retaliates my skin.  "Oh, you're putting sunscreen on?  Let me paint you a beautiful rash to go with that tan," it announces vengefully.  "Ooh is that a new bra strap? Me no likey," it says as a cluster of zits pops up on my shoulder.  

Throughout my life, friends, relatives, strangers and acquaintance have all pretty much unanimously agreed that I look very young for my age.  My features are not particularly young looking, especially if I'm wearing my serious face (also known as my RBF), and I've never been someone who would ever be considered baby-faced.  But I am in fact, very young looking for my age, and have been since junior high, which, coincidentally, is when those pesky pimples first made their debut.

I recently read a study about acne sufferers that posited that the skin of those with acne tends to look younger longer.  I mean, if this isn't some sick, twisted, mad scientist level irony, then I don't know what is.  The study, published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, measured the length of white blood cell telomeres in 1,205 twins from the TwinsUK cohort, where a quarter of the twins reported having experienced acne in their lifetime.

Scientists at King’s College London report that people who have previously suffered from acne have longer telomeres in their white blood cells compared to those with perfect skin. These telomeres, affectionately referred to as protective caps, apparently help keep chromosomes from deteriorating.  As a result, cells are better insulated against aging.  Bam!

I mean don't get me wrong, I think I would prefer clear skin over breakout cycles, but hey, at least there's some serious silver lining here.  So, until there is a cure, I try to take care of my skin as much as possible with a few favorite products.  Currently in rotation are all things Patchology for face, eyes and lips.

Eyes and Face:
I like to wear mascara; I also like to rub my eyes, and as the day progresses, the rubbing increase.  By the time the sun sets, there's more mascara around my eyes then there is on my lashes.  The first thing I do when I get home is use my handy, dandy Patchology Clean AF Facial Cleansing Wipes to give my eyes and face a good cleaning to remove all the beauty products.

Lips:
I've always really likes the phrase 'lip service.' There's something so sultry, mysterious and a bit salacious about it.  The Patchology Lip Service Gloss-to-Balm Treatment has really stolen my heart.  So much so that when I lost it, I immediately bought a new one and then found the lost one and now I can keep one in my purse and another at home.  It has a very subtle tingle, its deliciously refreshing and kind of a big deal.

Under Eyes:
Lastly, tired eyes are no one's friend, which is why my routine also includes the Patchology Rejuvenating Eye Night Gels, with a sweet shade of lilac, and a soft, jelly that’s cool to the touch.  They are light, comfortable, and a must have on my self-care list.  

So, until the war against acne has ended, at least there are some great little pick-me-ups to keep us going.  In the meantime, use code CLEANAF20 to get 20% all Patchology goodies.

You can read the full twin acne study article here.

With Love,
A.A.

This post is in collaboration with Patchology.  As always, thank you for reading and for your support.

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